Bail Bonds and Brothers: Paying for a Crime He Didn’t Commit

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Have you ever been mistaken for someone else?  Where someone walks up to you and starts talking to you like they know you before they realize you aren’t who they thought you were.  For those with siblings that look a lot like them, this can be a very common occurrence.  Most of the time, it is pretty funny and usually just embarrassing for people, but sometimes the mistaking of someone’s identity can be a pretty bad thing.  Just ask a Tennessee man who spent 20 days in jail for a crime that he didn’t commit.

Back in 2010, a man was arrested for shoplifting at a Kmart in Anderson County, Tennessee.  The man was identified through the stores surveillance cameras.  When police figured out who the man was, they went to his residence and arrested him.  The problem was they got the wrong guy.  Instead of arresting the man who committed the crime, they arrested his brother, who looked eerily similar.

It has now been 2 years and the man is still paying for his brother’s crime…literally.  He owes over $2,500 to the court and has to check in with a probation officer on a regular basis.  This of course doesn’t include the 20 days he spent in jail.  Meanwhile, his brother is still out running around free.  Apparently the statute of limitations has run out on law enforcement’s ability to charge the brother with the crime.  Doesn’t seem fair, but then again what else would you expect? The only thing we are certain about is that one brother won’t be getting a Christmas card this year.  Read the original story below.

Original story: Mistaken identity: Tennessee man, fighting to get record cleared, says he served time for brother’s crime in shoplifting case

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Bail Bonds and Brothers: Paying for a Crime He Didn’t Commit

arrested expertbail mug shot

Have you ever been mistaken for someone else?  Where someone walks up to you and starts talking to you like they know you before they realize you aren’t who they thought you were.  For those with siblings that look a lot like them, this can be a very common occurrence.  Most of the time, it is pretty funny and usually just embarrassing for people, but sometimes the mistaking of someone’s identity can be a pretty bad thing.  Just ask a Tennessee man who spent 20 days in jail for a crime that he didn’t commit.

Back in 2010, a man was arrested for shoplifting at a Kmart in Anderson County, Tennessee.  The man was identified through the stores surveillance cameras.  When police figured out who the man was, they went to his residence and arrested him.  The problem was they got the wrong guy.  Instead of arresting the man who committed the crime, they arrested his brother, who looked eerily similar.

It has now been 2 years and the man is still paying for his brother’s crime…literally.  He owes over $2,500 to the court and has to check in with a probation officer on a regular basis.  This of course doesn’t include the 20 days he spent in jail.  Meanwhile, his brother is still out running around free.  Apparently the statute of limitations has run out on law enforcement’s ability to charge the brother with the crime.  Doesn’t seem fair, but then again what else would you expect? The only thing we are certain about is that one brother won’t be getting a Christmas card this year.  Read the original story below.

Original story: Mistaken identity: Tennessee man, fighting to get record cleared, says he served time for brother’s crime in shoplifting case